Sainsbury’s Savvy Moves

Sainsbury’s keeps upping the stakes on how a supermarket can do the right thing regarding food waste.

The British retailer commissioned research on how purchased food isn’t eaten and found that the average household tosses 10% of what they buy. And that comes at a cost–of about £50 per month.

Sainsbury’s also worked w/ quasi-governmental group WRAP to profile various shopper types. Their findings are just as important and more entertaining. For example, there are the Hungry Hoarders who shop on an empty stomach and buy too much. And the Ditzy Diarists who don’t consult their “diary” (schedule book) before shopping and, as a result of their plans, can’t use the fresh foods they bring home.

And these developments occur on the heels of the chain being the largest retail user of anaerobic digestion. And that came after Sainsbury’s zero waste to landfill pledge. Not bad, J. Sainsbury!

[Full disclosure: When I lived in London in 1997-1998, I shopped at Sainsbury's and swore by the Biere des Flandres and day-old bread (not necessarily together).]

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One Comment

  1. Posted November 12, 2011 at 7:18 pm | Permalink

    Good question, Lawrence. Methane is created when food decomposes anaerobically (without air). The difference between landfills and composting is that the latter is turned or exposed to air. That exposure to air prevents the creation of methane and the associated smell.

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